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Pakistan Security Research Unit (PSRU)
ILLIBERAL DEMOCRATS AND THE MARGINALISATION OF RELIGIOUS MINORITIES IN PAKISTAN  By Ajay K. Raina

The central argument of this paper is that the illiberal particularities of the politics of two of Pakistan’s greatest leaders – Muhammad Jinnah and Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto – decisively shaped the emergence of an Islamic. constitutional, legal, political, and educational context in ...Read more >

16 Pages
634.79 KB
THE INFLUENCE OF WAHHABISM IN PAKISTAN  By Simon Ross Valentine

In the last few years there have been repeated claims concerning the growing deleterious influence of Wahhabism in the Indian sub-continent and the support by the Saudi Arabian government of ...Read more >

12 Pages
516.85 KB
DOMINOES ON THE DURAND LINE? OVERCOMING STRATEGIC MYTHS IN AFGANISTAN AND PAKISTAN   

The death of Osama bin Laden presents an important opportunity to reassess U.S. strategy in Afghanistan. Current U.S. thinking centers on two interests. The first is preventing al Qaeda and its Taliban allies from reestablishing a safe haven. The second is preventing the violence in Afghanistan from destabilizing Pakistan, thus putting its nuclear forces at risk and increasing the likelihood of nuclear terrorism. Coalition strategy is based on the assumptions that the only way to deny al Qaeda ...Read more >

56 Pages
1.85 MB
COUNTER INSURGENCY IN PAKISTAN   

Beginning in 2001, Pakistan conducted a range of operations against militant groups in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and other parts of Pakistan. Because of Pakistan’s nuclear status and the presence of international terrorist organizations, such as al Qa’ida, Pakistan’s counterinsurgency campaign significantly affects the security of countries across North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East including the United ...Read more >

209 Pages
2.79 MB
CAN THE UNITED STATES SECURE AN INSECURE STATE?   

In the days following the tragic events of 9/11, Pakistan became a crucial partner in the U.S. counterattack on al Qaeda and al Qaeda’s ally, the Afghan Taliban. Pakistan permitted the United States to use its airspace; granted overland access to Afghanistan; and employed its army, police, and paramilitary organizations to capture al Qaeda activists. With the resurgence of the Afghan Taliban in Afghanistan in 2005, the United States refocused on stabilizing Afghanistan. It began pressuring ...Read more >

262 Pages
1.13 MB
THE PROBLEM OF PAKISTAN  

55 Pages
5.42 MB
PAKISTAN : VIOLENCE VS. STABILITY  

As the events surrounding the death of Osama Bin Laden make all too clear, Pakistan is passing through one of the most dangerous periods of instability in its history. This instability goes far beyond Al Qa?ida, the Taliban, and the war in Afghanistan. A net assessment of the patterns of violence and stability indicate that Pakistan is approaching a perfect storm of threats, including rising extremism, a failing economy, chronic underdevelopment, and an intensifying war, resulting in ...Read more >

205 Pages
4.05 MB
BRIEF NUMBER 64 : THE ARREST OF BRIG GEN ALI KHAN AND THE INFLUENCE OF HIZB-UT-TAHRIR IN PAKSTAN  

The arrest of Brig. Gen. Ali Khan, and four majors, on 6 May on charges of having links to Hizb-ul-Tahrir [HT] has caused an understandable media maelstrom of analysis and questioning. What does Khan's arrest tell us about the Pak government's policy towards extremism? How influential is HT in the Pak Armed forces, the Inter-Services Intelligence [ISI] (and the other intelligence service agencies in Pakistan, namely the Intelligence Bureau [IB] and the Military Intelligence [MI]), and in ...Read more >

7 Pages
251 KB
ABOUT PAKISTAN SECURITY RESEARCH UNIT (PSRU) : BRIEF NO 60  

Domestic politics has been a powerful propellant of Pakistans strategic policy toward India. In the early decades after independence, this strategy utilized not only diplomatic means to obtain control of Kashmir, but military instruments as well, until the defeat of 1971 brought a period of moderation. Thereafter, Pakistans acquisition of nuclear weapons gave it security from Indian attack and, notwithstanding the risk, the opportunity to press its advantage via the stability or instability ...Read more >

15 Pages
638.16 KB
ABOUT PAKISTAN SECURITY RESEARCH UNIT (PSRU) : BRIEF NO 61  

The analysis presented here suggests that while Pakistan has sufficient nuclear weapons to destroy a significant proportion of any invading Indian armoured force, it may exhaust most of its arsenal of an estimated 70–90 weapons in such an attempt. If Indian armed forces had prepared for a nuclear attack and were able to rapidly disperse, Pakistan may not have sufficient nuclear weapons to be able to destroy an Indian force. It is possible that the Pakistan army has recognized this problem. ...Read more >

10 Pages
573.79 KB