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5G, HUAWEI AND INDIA  By Maj Gen PK Mallick, VSM (Retd)

The ability to create and use new technologies is the source of economic strength and military security. Technology and the capacity to create new technologies are the basis of information age power. 5G as the cornerstone of a new digital environment is the focal point for the new competition. China’s success in creating globally competitive tele-communications firms has led the Chinese government’s desire to seize leadership in next generation Information Technology (IT). ...Read more >

19 Pages
1.49 MB
INDIA IN SPACE DOMAIN – PATHBREAKING DEVELOPMENTS  By Maj Gen PK Mallick, VSM (Retd)

India is now a major spacefaring nation. Initially, the Indian space programme was focused primarily on societal and developmental utilities. Today, like many other countries, India is compelled to use space for several military requirements like intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Hence, India is looking to space to gain operational and informational advantages. India has had its fair share of achievements in the space domain. It ...Read more >

36 Pages
820.76 KB

NATO 2030: UNITED FOR A NEW ERA  

NATO enters the eighth decade of its existence with both a longer record of success and a wider assortment of looming challenges than its founders could have foreseen when they signed the Washington Treaty in April 1949. In the thirty years since the collapse of the Soviet threat that called NATO into existence, the Western Alliance has defied innumerable predictions of its imminent demise. It ended two wars and ethnic cleansing in the Western Balkans, extended the hand of partnership to ...Read more >

67 Pages
324.59 KB
ISRAEL VERSUS ANYONE: A MILITARY NET ASSESSMENT OF THE MIDDLE EAST  By Kenneth S. Brower

Most published Middle Eastern military net assessments are based primarily on lists of units and equipment. Unfortunately, history proved that such lists are all too often incorrect. Even when they were correct, the overall assessments generally ignored the quality of personnel and/or equipment, as well as the extent to which rival defense systems could turn available financial, human, and material resources into actual military power. ...Read more >

49 Pages
764.20 KB
JOINT NET ASSESSMENT : US AND SOVIET STRATEGIC FORCES   By Director of Centra! Intelligence

The strategic nuclear balance is probably adequate to deter a direct nuclear attack on the United States or a major attack on Europe. The Soviets, in our view, have some clear advantages today, and these advantages are projected to continue, although differences may narrow somewhat in the next 10 years. It is likely, however, that the Soviets do not see their advantage as being as great as we would ...Read more >

43 Pages
4.12 MB
CHINA’S MILITARY & THE U.S.-JAPAN ALLIANCE IN 2030  By MICHAEL D. SWAINE et al.

T he Asia century is well under way, and with it the emerging challenges of a region in transition…. Any sound future policy will require a thorough assessment of China’s evolving military and foreign security capabilities and of the capacity and willingness of Tokyo and Washington to sustain their historic cooperation. There are no guarantees that the future will resemble the recent past, and the best approaches for continued deterrence ...Read more >

424 Pages
3.23 MB
DOD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES AND CYBERSECURITY PRACTICES MAY IMPACT COST AND SCHEDULE  By United States Government Accountability Office

In support of its military operations, DOD manages many IT investments, including investments in business, communications, and command and control systems. The department’s IT budget organizes investments in four categories, called mission areas—enterprise information environment, business, warfighting, and intelligence. Figure 1 shows the amount of DOD’s total unclassified requested fiscal year 2020 IT budget (of $36.1 billion) that the department plans to spend on each of its ...Read more >

63 Pages
1.49 MB
ARMY DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION STRATEGY  By Headquarters, Department of the Army

The adoption of leading edge technologies by the Army’s and the United States’ near-peer adversaries, combined with the rapid pace of change in technology, is creating new and complex challenges for how the Army operates and maintains overmatch across all domains – land, sea, air, space, and cyberspace. As the Army responds to the growing need for digital technologies through Army modernization ...Read more >

18 Pages
4.19 MB
DIGITAL STRATEGY FOR DEFENCE: DELIVERING THE DIGITAL BACKBONE AND UNLEASHING THE POWER OF DEFENCE’S DATA  

We are living in an era of accelerating technological change - everywhere we look datadriven capabilities are changing the way we communicate, live and work. We are becoming increasingly empowered by, and dependent on, digital technology. This creates both opportunities and threats, as our opponents proactively seek to exploit the same tools at our expense. Given the widespread availability of these technologies, advantage will come from their rapid ...Read more >

41 Pages
3.27 MB
UNDERSTANDING AND PROTECTING VITAL U.S. DEFENSE SUPPLY CHAINS  By Maiya Clark

The United States has entered a new era of great-power competition with China. As the country makes this shift, policymakers are forced to reevaluate some lingering assumptions that drove defense policy during the Cold War, the country’s last period of sustained great-power competition. The competition with the Soviet Union was a competition between two spheres that rarely overlapped: The United States had very little commerce with the Soviet Union, and the global economy was ...Read more >

19 Pages
291.70 KB
POLITICS, POWER, AND INFLUENCE: DEFENSE INDUSTRIES IN THE POST-COLD WAR  By João Carlos Gonçalves dos Reis

In the post-Cold War period, the defense industry had a major influence on the hierarchy of State powers (Neuman 2010) however, the defense sector received little or no attention from scholars and professionals, which justifies this research. Since the end of the Cold War, the defense industry changed, as the nature of war shifted from large arsenals to highly innovative and highly accurate weapon systems (PwC 2005). Thus, the defense industry had to adapt to survive in order to reduce ...Read more >

14 Pages
1.69 MB
VITAL SIGNS 2021: THE HEALTH AND READINESS OF THE DEFENSE INDUSTRIAL BASE  By NDIA

In 2018, the Department of Defense (DoD) released “Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the United States” (13806 Report), a report focused on the production risks to critical defense industrial supply chains. The report starkly framed the health of the U.S. defense industrial base (DIB) as key to the readiness of the United States in an age of great-power competition. Despite the 13806 Report’s high-resolution ...Read more >

64 Pages
10.54 MB
TO BE MORE INNOVATIVE THE DIB NEEDS TO BE MORE DIVERSE  By Kwasi Mitchell et al.

The DIB is a people industry. A few companies may have solutions or technologies that others cannot match, but for the vast majority - even the largest companies - maintaining a competitive edge depends on talent. A skilled and diverse workforce is more likely to deliver results on time. As a result competition for skilled, experienced talent in the DIB can be ...Read more >

28 Pages
2.23 MB
DEFENCE AND SECURITY INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY: A STRATEGIC APPROACH TO THE UK’S DEFENCE AND SECURITY INDUSTRIAL SECTORS  

As the Integrated Review sets out, the United Kingdom has a global role and global responsibilities. We are a Permanent Member of the United Nations, a leading member of the Commonwealth, a lynchpin member of NATO, and a vital contributor to wider European security, with enduring relationships to our Five Eyes partners and to our many friends and allies around the world. ...Read more >

112 Pages
2.86 MB
REPORT OF THE DEFENSE CRITICAL SUPPLY CHAIN TASK FORCE  By House Armed Services Committee

Over the past 18 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has become clear that US supply chains have firmly established themselves as an issue of both economic security and national security. Late night calls in search of masks for our nurses, hand sanitizer for our citizens, and microchips for our automakers, laid bare these vulnerabilities in the commercial sector. That searing experience put new focus on defense supply chains – meaning the international networks that provide the goods and ...Read more >

24 Pages
383.09 KB
DOD SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS  

This issuance applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Defense, the Defense Agencies, the DoD Field Activities, and all other organizational entities within the DoD (referred to collectively in this issuance as the ...Read more >

35 Pages
303.10 KB
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMUNICATOR COMPETENCY MODEL (MCCM)  

Use effective mass communication theories to communicate the commander s objective to the intended audience. Use full spectrum of photographic abilities to create sophisticated photographic products for specific and general audiences. Use full spectrum of videography ability to create sophisticated video products for specific and general ...Read more >

36 Pages
9.67 MB